Evening School Sem 1 2020

Four philosophy taught in Melbourne March - June.

The Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy is proud to present the Evening School Semester 1 2020 curriculum. Three of the courses are 24 hours in length, while one is 16 hours long. Also the 1000 Plateaus course will be taught on two nights per week - it's the same course so don't enrol in both. As always significant discounts apply for those enrolling in multiple courses. If you have any questions which aren't in our FAQs please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Dear MSCP Community,

We have decided to suspend all face-to-face teaching at the school, effective from Tuesday, March 17. There shall be no face-to-face classes after Monday, March 16.

Dr Russell Grigg's course on Love has been cancelled but will be offered again in Semester 2. You may request a full refund or stay enrolled for then.

Both Dr. Jon Roffe and Dr. Valery Vinogradis's courses will continue in online/distance mode ONLY.

Attendance students who have already paid who would like a refund rather than continue as distance students should email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and cc in This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

We are sorry for this but have no option.

Sincerely,
MSCP Committee.

When: 9 March - 19 June 2020

Where: Church of All Nations (CAN), 180 Palmerston st, Carlton. There will be MSCP signage at CAN. Note: Disabled access is via the rear of the building which will also have MSCP signage.

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Fees:

Courses Waged Unwaged
Lessons on Love Only $180 $120
One 12 Week Course $225 $150
Two or more Courses $270 $180
Enrol Here


The enrolment form includes both attendance and distance enrolment options. Distance Enrolment is available for all courses.

 

Evening School Programme

2 hours per week for 12 Weeks except for Lessons on Love which is 8 Weeks

Mon 6.30-8.30pm
Starts 9 March
Gilles Deleuze: From Philosophy to Cinema
Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe
Tues 6.30-8.30pm
Starts 10 March
Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus
Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe
Wed 6.30-8.30pm
Starts 18 March
Eight Lessons on Love - CANCELLED
Lecturer: Russell Grigg
Thur 6.30-8.30pm
Starts 12 March
A Sceptical Style: Montaigne's Impressionism
Lecturer: Dr Valery Vinogradis
Fri 6.30-8.30pm
Starts 13 March
Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus
Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe

 

Course Descriptions


es sem1 1Gilles Deleuze: From Philosophy to Cinema

Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe

Schedule: 6.30-8.30pm. 12 Mondays starting March 9 (excluding 13 April)

Location: CAN, 180 Palmerston St, Carlton.

This course will present a thorough-going introduction to Deleuze’s two monumental and difficult works on the cinema. The course is effectively broken up into five moments:

1) An introduction to the Bergsonian framework of Deleuze’s analysis of the cinema

2) An account of the structure and elementary components of the classical cinema of the movement-image

3) An account of the failure of the classical cinema, its causes and its consequences (positive and negative) for the cinema

4) An account of the structure and elementary components of the modern cinema of the time-image

5) An account of the nature of subjectivity and politics in light of what the modern cinema is able to accomplish

The course will conclude by adopting a broader perspective and asking what the significance of the cinema books in the context of the trajectory of his work as a whole.

The extended format of this seminar will allow for the inclusion of a significant selection of examples drawn from the cinema.

The week by week breakdown will be as follows:

  1. Introduction. Bergson’s account of perception, action, movement and time.
  2. On the inhumanity of the cinema. Shot, cut, montage.
  3. Four forms of montage
  4. Three elementary movement-images: perception-images, affection-images, action-images
  5. Three intermediary images: impulse-images, reflection-images, relation-images
  6. The crisis of the action-image and the birth of the modern cinema
  7. Neo-realism and the opsign, mnemosign and onirosign
  8. The structure of the time-image. Recapitulating Bergson on time. The crystal-image
  9. Three chronosigns.
  10. Cinema and thought. Montage and the brain in modern cinema. The people to come
  11. The case of the lectosign and the pedagogy of the cinema.
  12. Speculative conclusion. Two readings of the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze

 


rhizomeDeleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus

Lecturer: Dr Jon Roffe

Due to demand the course will be repeated on two nights.  It's the same course - please do not attend both nights.

Schedule: 6.30-8.30pm. 12 Tuesdays starting March 10 (excluding 14 April) OR 12 Fridays commencing March 13 (excluding March 20, April 10 & 17 - ending June 19th)

Location: CAN, 180 Palmerston St, Carlton.

Gilles Deleuze called it ‘our most immoderate and worst received book’, but A Thousand Plateaus, written with Félix Guattari and published in 1980 remains one of most influential texts of twentieth century European thought. It also remains a daunting challenge to readers, ranging as it does from metallurgy to music, wolves to warfare, lobsters to linguistics.

This course will present a detailed, thematic and systematic account of all of the major arguments of the book, moving from its dynamic cosmological vision to the minutiae of capitalist economics that it presents. Particular attention will be given to teasing out the various layers of the book’s argumentation, with the aim of clarifying its discrete goals as a philosophical account of reality. The course will also aim to identify the normative goals of the book, what it thinks we should do as human beings. To do this, we will pay close attention to the nexus of three concepts: violence, politics and ethics.

  1. Introduction. Structures, signs and play.
  2. Deleuze and Guattari’s broad cosmology. The strata and the assemblage.
  3. From biology to behaviour. From the milieu to the territory.
  4. Signs-Languages. From tropical fish to the Financial Times.
  5. Human being. The face over the head, and the body beneath the body.
  6. Becoming-other. Deleuze and Guattari’s ethics.
  7. Components of a social theory I. Lines and segments.
  8. Components of a social theory II. Space and society.
  9. States and nomads. Warfare.
  10. The pre-State, the State, and the city. Deleuze and Guattari’s noourbanography.
  11. Capitalism and beyond.
  12. Conclusion. Mechanosphere.

 


lacanEight Lessons on Love - CANCELLED

Lecturer: Russell Grigg

Schedule: 6.30-8.30pm. 8 Wednesdays starting March 18 (excluding 14 April)

All Dates: March 18, 25, April 8, 22, 29, May 13, 20, 27.

Location: CAN, 180 Palmerston St, Carlton.

Lacan famously speaks at length about desire, and what he says has been widely discussed. But what he says about love has received nowhere near the same attention. These eight lessons explore the contribution he makes to thinking about this most complex aspect of the human condition. Love is difficult to analyse precisely because it is regarded as the richest and most significant human experience as well as dismissed as an idealisation that conceals its deceptive and illusory nature. The challenge of these “lessons” will be to take both features into account.

  1. To open the question: is all love neurotic?
  2. The paradoxes of love and desire
  3. Lacan and love in The Symposium I
  4. Lacan and love in The Symposium II
  5. To love is to give what one does not have
  6. Love in the time of the non-sexual relation
  7. A lover’s discourse
  8. Psychoanalysis and transference love

 


es sem1 3A Sceptical Style: Montaigne's Impressionism

Lecturer: Dr Valery Vinogradis

Schedule: 6.30-8.30pm. 12 Thursdays from March 12 (excluding 16 April)

Location: CAN, 180 Palmerston St, Carlton.

To claim an objective voice, many philosophers choose to leave their personalities on the margins of their work. This scholarly approach to doing philosophy does not imply, however, that placing a philosophical pesona at the centre of a work necessarily inhibits philosophical understanding, and the work's universal significance. On the contrary, the history of philosophy suggests that both approaches are valid. We just happen to live in an age where a more intimate approach to philosophising is left on the margins of the academy, and of the standard philosophy curriculum. What a shame!

This extensive course engages with Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), a grandiose Renaissance philosophical and literary phenomenon who is hard to classify. Montaigne's  Essays (1580-1595) is a revolt against the domineering pretensions of the Western culture, a revolt against the scholastic, lifeless manner of philosophising. Montaigne erects no philosophical system, while interrogating major and marginalised topics in philosophy and culture. His artistic and delicate manner of thinking and writing (known as "impressionism") has no precedent, and has inspired thinkers and artists across the world.

In the Essays, Montaigne draws from a plethora of authors as he questions the most fundamental beliefs about humanity. Thanks to his intellect, wit and imagination, Montaigne exposes all kinds of erroneous and harmful judgements, playfully entertains alternative views and curious observations, humbles and invites the reader to exercise the judgement of their own. In this way, Montaigne indeed deserves to be called "the first modern man", one who inculcates the significance of individuality as an integral part of the world. However, as we shall see, Montaigne is also a contemporary author: the world and the problems we discover in the Essays are those which we have to confront, too.

The course's structure is loose enough to accommodate Montaigne's impressionistic style: the freedom and wide scope of his reflections nonetheless reveal a rich individual, who deploys critical and creative writing to exercise his humanity. What is Montaigne's vision of humanity, as it is situated in the world? To respond to this overarching problem, three central ideas are explored during the course: scepticism, education, and culture wars. Each lecture will draw from Montaigne's Essays and the secondary literature:

Week 1: Cultural Context: the Renaissance

  • Durant, W (1953). The Renaissance. New York: Simon and Shuster

Week 2: Montaigne: the Modern Man

  • Desan, P (2017). Montaigne: a Life. Princeton: PUP
  • Zweig, S (1960). Montaigne. Frankfurt: Fischer

Week 3: Scepticism is Humanism: on Curiosity and Diversity

  • Hartle, A (2006). 'Montaigne and Scepticism'. In Cambridge Companion to Montaigne, ed. Ullrich Langer. Cambridge: CUP
  • Zalloa, Z (2016). 'Montaigne on Curiosity'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

Week 4: Doing Philosophy: Reading, Writing, Teaching, Thinking, Imagining

  • Knop, D (2016). 'Montaigne on Rhetoric'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Williams, W (2016). 'Montaigne on Imagination'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Mack, P (2016). 'Montaigne on Reading'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

Week 5: Politics and Miracles

  • Thompson, D (2018). Montaigne and the Tolerance of Politics. Oxford: OUP
  • Fontana, B (2016). 'The political Thought of Montaigne'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Langer, U (2006). 'Montaigne Political and Religious Context'. Cambridge Companion to Montaigne, ed. Ullrich Langer. Cambridge: CUP

Week 6: Friendship, Sexuality, Gender, Love

  • MacPhail, E (2016). 'Montaigne on Friendship'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Zalloua, Z (2009). 'Theaorizing Sex and Gender in Montaigne'. In Montaigne After Theory/Theory After Montaigne. Washington: UWP
  • Guild, E (2016). 'Montaigne on Love'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

Week 7: Melancholy and Dying

  • Screech, M (1983). Montaigne & Melancholy - The Wisdom of the Essays. London: Duckworth
  • Skenazi, C (2016). 'Montaigne on Aging'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Heitsch, D (2016). 'Montaigne on Health and Death'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

Week 8: Violence, Monstrosity, and Savagery

  • Shklar, J (1984). Ordinary Vices. Cambridge: HUP
  • Nazarian, C (2016). 'Montaigne on Violence'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Long, K (2016). 'Montaigne on Mosters and Monstrosity'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

Week 9: Santient Creation and Compassion

  • Gontier, T (2016). 'Montaigne on Animals'.  In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP
  • Gauna, M (2000). Montaigne and the Ethics of Compassion. Lewiston: The Edwin Mellen Press.

Week 10: A Life Worth Living

  • Goyet, F (2006). 'Montaigne and the Notion of Prudence'. Cambridge Companion to Montaigne, ed. Ullrich Langer. Cambridge: CUP
  • Darryl, M (2012). 'The Pedagogy of Self-Fashioning'. Studies in Philosophy & Education vol 31: 387-405

Week 11: A New World: Nietzsche and Foucault

  • Miner, R (2017). Nietzsche and Montaigne. London: Palgrave Mcmillan
  • Zalloua, Z (2009). 'Confession or Parrhesia? Foucault after Montaigne'. In Montaigne After Theory/Theory After Montaigne. Washington: UWP

Week 12: Montaigne: the Contemporary Man

  • Hartle, A (2003). Michel de Montaigne: Accidental Philosopher. Cambridge: CUP
  • Schiffman, ZS (2016). 'Montaigne: Early Modern, Modern, Postmodern'. In the Oxford Handbook of Montaigne, ed. Philippe Desan. Oxford: OUP

 

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Course Descriptions